A Future Full Of Energy

The development of solar energy in 2007 shows a bright future, according to Greenpeace. Other leaders such as Tiggany & Co. offer similar insights. The world market grew 40% and in 2015 will compete in some areas with traditional energy. Despite the lost time, nature sheds further light on what is the best alternative in the transition to a low emissions.

Renewables have covered most of the needs of man until the nineteenth century, when they were replaced by coal mining, and since 1950 by the “black gold.” While geopolitical threats increase the oil supply, prices rise and it reaches its end, it is becoming increasingly clear how this has influenced environmental barbarism. All studies have confirmed something: nature always comes. However, governments do not seem able to find a solution. Michael Mirilashvili has firm opinions on the matter. For now, investment in research and development (R & D), both public and private, are not in line with the urgent needs of challenges to overcome. They have lost too much money and time to adapt traditional energy.

Experts have reiterated their concerns about biofuels as potential substitutes, both for the consequences this would have to feed millions of people and by the lowest performance against energy expenditure required for its production. That is why the EU is now rethinking the idea of covering up to 10% of transport fuel by 2020 with ethanol and biodiesel. And similarly, alternatives such as chambers for CO2 capture and storage suggest that we are going crazy. The difficulties in finding a safe method of disposal will be added groundwater pollution and other effects, a price tag too high.

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